English Grammar: AUXILIARY VERBS – be, do, have
14 октября 2018

English Grammar: AUXILIARY VERBS – be, do, have

English Grammar: AUXILIARY VERBS – be, do, have
Do we say, "I am eat" or "I am eating"? What about "He didn't go" or "He didn't went"? These questions and more will be answered when you watch this English grammar lesson on auxiliary verbs. I will teach you how to use the three auxiliary verbs in English – "be", "do", and "have". We will go over each one in detail and with examples. First, you will learn how to use "be" in the passive and progressive forms in the present, past, and future. Then, we will look at "do" in the present and past simple. Last, I will teach you how to use "have" in the future, present, and past perfect. Plus, we will discuss the positive and negative use of "do" as an auxiliary verb". Whew! There's a lot of material here, so make sure you do the quiz at https://www.engvid.com/auxiliary-verbs-be-do-have/ to test your understanding. TRANSCRIPT My name's Ronnie and I'm going to teach you some grammar. It's kind of a... difficult grammar, but once you learn this overview of-dunh, dunh, dunh, dunh-"Auxiliary Verbs", English grammar is going to become easier for you, I hope. So, if you're just beginning to learn English grammar, oh, stay in there, you can do it. Yuri, this goes out to you in Salvador, Brazil. Let's keep going, man. We have three auxiliary verbs that we use in English: "be", "do", and "have". But the thing about the auxiliary verbs is that each auxiliary verb will tell us what kind of grammar we're going to use with it. So, let's look at the first one: "be". So, "be" in its form in the present tense is "am", "is", "are"; negative: "am not", "isn't", and "aren't". These are present. The past tense would be present... Or, no. The past tense in the positive is "was" and "were"; negative: "wasn't" and "weren't". So, how do we actually use this auxiliary verb? And the answer is: We use it in two forms of English grammar. The first one is progressive. So, if you have a progressive sentence, we have present progressive, past progressive, and future progressive. Every time we have a sentence in English with progressive, we know we're going to use the verb "to be". So, if our sentence is present progressive, we're going to use the present tense of the verb "to be", "is am are" with a verb with "ing". So, in English grammar, anything that's progressive or continuous is another word for the same grammar, it's always going to be an "ing" on the verb. The thing that changes and tells us the grammar is the verb "to be". Present is: "is", "am", "are", plus verb "ing", but the past, we're going to use the past tense: "was" and "were" plus verb "ing". So, progressive will always have a verb "ing". The thing that changes the tense of it is the verb "to be". We have future progressive or future continuous. In this one we're simply going to use the verb "will", so in this one we have "will be" plus verb "ing". For example: "I will be eating pizza." This tells us what's going to happen in the future. "I was eating pizza" was the past, and "I am eating pizza", something's happening now, that's present progressive. So, the progressive will always have the verb "to be", either past, present, or future, and it will always have an "ing" on the verb. Okay, cool. Let's get more complicated, okay? We have another structure in English grammar called passive. Now, passive voice basically you're taking the action from the person or the focus on the person, and we're putting it towards the activity. So, in a normal English sentence we would say: "I eat lunch", but in a passive sentence, we're taking away the subject and we're focusing on the action. So, with the passive voice we have future passive, present passive, and past passive. It goes along the same idea, is that the verb "to be" is going to tell us: Is it present? Or if it's past. When we use a passive sentence, we can only ever use the past participle of the verb, or the third step of the verb. So, passive will always be the verb "to be" plus the past participle. If it's present, it's: "is", "am", "are", plus PP, past participle. If it's past, it's "was" and "were" plus past participle. It's hard to say the past participle, so I'm going to say PP. I have to go PP. So, as an example, we say: "Lunch is eaten", present tense. "Lunch was eaten". I'm going to step away and let you check that out. Let your brain absorb it. Make some sentences using this and the verb "to be". If we used the future passive, I could say: "Lunch will be eaten", so again, when we're using the future, we use "will be", but we're going to use the past participle. Have you made some sentences? Do it now. Come on. Make some sentences. Go. Okay. So we've done the verb "to be". And hopefully it's beginning to make sense, because English grammar rarely makes sense. I'm going to make it make it make sense for you. So, the next one is the auxiliary verb "do". Now, this one's interesting because we only use it in the negative form in the simple present, or we use it in the negative simple past. […]
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